The challenge is to accomplish new ways of communication in severely paralyzed people

People who have lost all or almost all contact with their muscles have great difficulty communicating with others, nor can they interact freely with their environment, even though many are in possession of full mental abilities. They have what is called the Locked-in syndrome. Although perhaps this does not happen to many people (we estimate communication is only possible by someone asking the paralyzed person questions that can be answered with a yes or no (for instance one versus two eye blinks). A Brain-Computer Interface could in principle provide a Locked-in person with a new channel of communication, one that reads directly from the brain and translates intentions to actions within dedicated software for communication or control over home devices. Many labs have developed non-invasive solutions using scalp electrodes but, to date, there are still a number of issues that are unresolved, and non-invasive brain-computer interfaces remain unavailable for most Locked-in patients. Signals recorded directly from the brain are much more clear and detailed and potentially offer more degrees of freedom. We investigate the feasibility of using brain implants to provide Locked-in people with a new means of communication that is always available, even at night.about 3 per one million people), the impact on daily life is  severe. Often communication is only possible by someone asking the paralyzed person questions that can be answered with a yes or no (for instance one versus two eye blinks). A Brain-Computer Interface could in principle provide a Locked-in person with a new channel of communication, one that reads directly from the brain and translates intentions to actions within dedicated software for communication or control over home devices. Many labs have developed non-invasive solutions using scalp electrodes but, to date, there are still a number of issues that are unresolved, and non-invasive brain-computer interfaces remain unavailable for most Locked-in patients. Signals recorded directly from the brain are much more clear and detailed and potentially offer more degrees of freedom. We investigate the feasibility of using brain implants to provide Locked-in people with a new means of communication that is always available, even at night.

BCI at work_11